First-half taxes due Thursday, Dec. 20

Harvey County News

Posts

36 minutes ago

Harvey County

Holidays are coming up, so the Courthouse will be closed for a day or two here and there. Here are a few dates to keep in mind as we head into the new year:

Dec. 20: First-half taxes due
Dec. 24: County facilities closed (No commission meeting)
Dec. 25: County facilities closed
Dec. 31: Commission meeting, 9 a.m.
Jan. 1: County facilities closed
Jan. 7: Commission meeting, 9 a.m.
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2 hours ago

Healthy Harvey Coalition

American Heart Association
Research shows Americans have more fatal heart attacks during the holiday season than any other time of the year. Know the signs and don't hesitate to call 9-1-1. spr.ly/6189EGVit
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American Heart Association

Come by 215 S. Pine Street for the Open House today - December 17. 3:30-5:00PM

Something on every floor!

Check out the north stairway!!
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Come by 215 S. Pine Street for the Open House today - December 17.  3:30-5:00PM

Something on every floor!

Check out the north stairway!!

Stop in at Pine Street Open House today- December 17 - from 3:30-5:00PM. ... See moreSee less

Stop in at Pine Street Open House today- December 17 -  from 3:30-5:00PM.

1 day ago

Harvey County Health Department

Just one of the many groups hosted from your Health Department.

Stop in today at 215 S. Pine Street from 3:30-5:00PM and see what else we are doing!!As a regular part of their duties, agents serve on several community boards, councils and coalitions. Aaron Swank - Nutrition & Family Finance Agent - represents K-State Research & Extension on the Harvey County Food & Farm Council. The council is working hard to create an environment where safe, healthy foods are accessible to all Harvey County residents. Their work takes great strides in curbing food insecurity for at-risk residents and helps gather and distribute information regarding education and skills training for residents interested in food service and the culinary arts. Regarding his service on Food & Farm Council, Aaron said:

"I am humbled to serve with this amazing group of people. The work we do on Food & Farm Council goes a long way to providing healthy, affordable foods to all citizens of Harvey County. Together, we can make a more sustainable, accessible, and culturally adequate food system in Harvey County. I appreciate the opportunity to contribute to this wonderful group."

Aaron is working toward a certification as a ServSafe Manager Trainer, with the goal of teaching local food service business and non-profit organizations valuable skills in food safety, preparation, storage, and distribution. Aaron would like to work with other community entities to contribute to currently operating skills training and education to broaden interest and strengthen safe food handling methods. If you or someone you know works in the food industry in Harvey County and are interested in learning more, contact Aaron at the Harvey County Research & Extension office at (316)284-6930.
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Just one of the many groups hosted from your Health Department.  

Stop in today at 215 S. Pine  Street from 3:30-5:00PM and see what else we are doing!!

1 day ago

Healthy Harvey Coalition

You can check out all the great work of the coalition too!Stop in today (12/17) from 3:30-5:00PM for a Pine Street Open House! ... See moreSee less

You can check out all the great work of the coalition too!

1 day ago

Harvey County Food & Farm Council

Stop in today (12/17) from 3:30-5:00PM for a Pine Street Open House! ... See moreSee less

Stop in today (12/17) from 3:30-5:00PM for a Pine Street Open House! ... See moreSee less

Stop in today (12/17) from 3:30-5:00PM for a Pine Street Open House!

3 days ago

Healthy Harvey Coalition

Yesterday we saw the start of a congregate meal service in Hesston at the Hesston Senior Center. People 60 and over can visit the center for lunch Monday through Friday, and also receive a meal to take home for evenings and weekends. It's a nutritious, cheap option for seniors who may not have the resources to prepare their own meals.

It's been a goal of our Department on Aging to bring meal options to seniors across the county. We're getting closer. Newton, Halstead and Hesston have programs in place, and Sedgwick starts next week.
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While we had crazy Kansas winds yesterday the parks crew worked on building picnic tables. A few have already gone out this morning. ... See moreSee less

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You guys rock!

They all work hard and do a great job!!

4 days ago

Harvey County

Yesterday we saw the start of a congregate meal service in Hesston at the Hesston Senior Center. People 60 and over can visit the center for lunch Monday through Friday, and also receive a meal to take home for evenings and weekends. It's a nutritious, cheap option for seniors who may not have the resources to prepare their own meals.

It's been a goal of our Department on Aging to bring meal options to seniors across the county. We're getting closer. Newton, Halstead and Hesston have programs in place, and Sedgwick starts next week.
... See moreSee less

Yesterday we saw the start of a congregate meal service in Hesston at the Hesston Senior Center. People 60 and over can visit the center for lunch Monday through Friday, and also receive a meal to take home for evenings and weekends. Its a nutritious, cheap option for seniors who may not have the resources to prepare their own meals. 

Its been a goal of our Department on Aging to bring meal options to seniors across the county. Were getting closer. Newton, Halstead and Hesston have programs in place, and Sedgwick starts next week.Image attachment

Here's an inside peak at the awesome collaboration we were a part of yesterday to help pack up boxes of food for the First Responders Holiday Helpers event. It's a well-oiled machine (and we sped the video up to make it look like we're super fast). There were first responders there from Harvey County, City of Newton, Sedgwick County and more. It's an amazing feeling to know the effort is going toward something great right here in our communities. Thanks again to everyone that helped make this possible for us. ... See moreSee less

First Responders Holiday Helpers packing

 

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Were all the boxes given out?

nice work

Great job well done and God bless all of you guys

Amanda Gerber , My home town an country law enforcement team

That is awesome!!!

You all rock

Thank you for again helping our community❤️

Great job!

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5 days ago

Harvey County Parks

This weeks critter is the:
Carolina Wren
Scientific name: Thryothorus ludovicianus
Length: 4.7 – 5.5 in. (12 – 14 cm.)
Weight: 0.6 – 0.8 oz. (18-22g)
Wingspan: 11.4 in. (29 cm.)

The Carolina wren is a small, chunky and round – shaped bird. The species is smaller than a sparrow and larger than a house wren. Both male and female adults are Reddish – brown or chestnut colored on the topside of their body with light cinnamon colored underparts. This bird has a bold white stripe above its eye, extending to the base of its head. The bill is long, thin and slightly down curved. The chin and throat of the bird is white. The tail of this bird is about the size of its body, and is often times cocked up. The wings and tail have bold dark barring. Individuals will perch bent over, holding their tails up which emphasizes the black barring. These birds are usually found in dense woodland and shrubby habitats. Individuals visit neighborhood areas and will visit feeders, especially during colder months. The Carolina wren is the state bird of South Carolina, and individuals have been known to live up to ten years.
Look and listen for Carolina wrens singing and calling in wooded areas. They like to creep around vegetation, looking for insects and fruit. It is considered to be a weak flyer, and tends to make brief, quick aerial forays over short distances. They like to move low through a tangled understory of vines and bushes. These birds are rarely stationary and avoid being out in the open for extended periods of time. In neighborhoods, this bird explores yard and wood, sometimes nesting there. This wren usually forages with its tail up. While singing, the tail is down. These birds defend their territories with constant singing and calling. They may use loud calls to defend against predators and intruders.
The Carolina wren is a common species of wren that lives in the eastern half of the United States, the southern part of Ontario, Canada and the extreme northeastern part of Mexico. They do not migrate and are somewhat limited by winter conditions. Severe winters restrict the northern limit of their range, while a mild winter will lead to northward extension of their breeding range. There are seven recognized subspecies of Carolina wren, each having a slightly different song and appearance. Individuals from southern Texas and northeastern Mexico are more boldly barred on the wings and tail and also are barred faintly on the flanks and back. Individuals from southern Mexico and central America are dingy white below with brown upper-parts. The Florida population has individuals that are larger and darker in color.
The loud and cheerful song is often times heard before the bird is seen. Both sexes use alarm calls, but only the males sing to advertise territory. Males sing a series of quick whistled notes. These are usually repeated in three parts, “tea – kettle – tea – kettle,” or “Germany – Germany.”
The Carolina wren’s diet mostly consists of insects and spiders. They climb and hop up branches, foraging for insects. They use their curved bills to turn over decaying vegetation and hammer larger bugs. Other food items for this bird include: caterpillars, moths, stick bugs, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets and cockroaches. On occasion, these wrens will eat lizards, frogs, or snakes. They also eat a small amount of plant matter, such as fruit pulp and seeds from bayberry, sweetgum or poison ivy.
Female Caroling wrens can begin laying eggs as early as March in southern populations and as early as April in northern populations. A pair may bond at any time of the year and will remain together for life. Individuals nesting in the northern part of the range usually raise two broods per year, while pairs in the southern region can raise up to three per year. Pairs stay bonded year- round and do not take a break from defending their territory. Carolina wrens nest in open cavities 3-6 feet off the ground, in trees or other more versatile areas. They may make use of flower pots and mailboxes. Carolina wrens nests have even been found in coat pockets and boots. Both males and females build their nests together. One may stay at the nest site while the other gathers materials. The nest is loosely constructed with a wide variety of materials being used (bark, dried grass, dead leaves, pine needles, hair, paper, string, shed snake skin, plastic). The first nest may take a week or longer to build, while later nests may take only 4 days. Multiple nests may be built before one is selected. The nest is cup-shaped and usually domed having a side entrance. Many times the nest has a woven extension similar to an entry-way or porch. Nests may vary in size, ranging from 3-9 inches long and 3-6 inches wide.
The clutch size of the Carolina wren is between 3 and 7 eggs. Egg length is about 0.7 inches long and 0.6 inches wide, and are white/cream or pinkish white with fine rusty-brown spots. Chicks emerge after a 10-16 day incubation period and are covered in pale grayish down. After fledging the nest, family groups will search for food together.
Carolina wrens will visit suet-filled feeders and in cold northern winters they will take shelter in nest boxes containing dried grasses. They particularly like boxes with slots rather than holes. During breeding season these wrens may nest in boxes, but are just as likely to choose a hanging plant or brush pile for a nesting site. Consider putting up a nest box to attract a breeding p air. Put the box up well before breeding season and attach a guard to keep out predators. Learn about offering shelter to backyard birds at www.allaboutbirds.org/how-to-provide-seeds-and-shelter-for-backyard-birds/. Keeping a brush pile in your yard is a great way to encourage wrens to take up residence there.

Sources
Dunne, P. (2006). Pete Dunne’s essential field guide companion. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, New York, USA.
... See moreSee less

This weeks critter is the:
Carolina Wren
Scientific name: Thryothorus ludovicianus
Length: 4.7 – 5.5 in. (12 – 14 cm.)
Weight: 0.6 – 0.8 oz. (18-22g) 
Wingspan: 11.4 in. (29 cm.) 

 The Carolina wren is a small, chunky and round – shaped bird. The species is smaller than a sparrow and larger than a house wren.  Both male and female adults are Reddish – brown or chestnut colored on the topside of their body with light cinnamon colored underparts. This bird has a bold white stripe above its eye, extending to the base of its head. The bill is long, thin and slightly down curved. The chin and throat of the bird is white. The tail of this bird is about the size of its body, and is often times cocked up. The wings and tail have bold dark barring. Individuals will perch bent over, holding their tails up which emphasizes the black barring. These birds are usually found in dense woodland and shrubby habitats. Individuals visit neighborhood areas and will visit feeders, especially during colder months. The Carolina wren is the state bird of South Carolina, and individuals have been known to live up to ten years.
 Look and listen for Carolina wrens singing and calling in wooded areas. They like to creep around vegetation, looking for insects and fruit. It is considered to be a weak flyer, and tends to make brief, quick aerial forays over short distances. They like to move low through a tangled understory of vines and bushes. These birds are rarely stationary and avoid being out in the open for extended periods of time. In neighborhoods, this bird explores yard and wood, sometimes nesting there. This wren usually forages with its tail up. While singing, the tail is down. These birds defend their territories with constant singing and calling. They may use loud calls to defend against predators and intruders. 
 The Carolina wren is a common species of wren that lives in the eastern half of the United States, the southern part of Ontario, Canada and the extreme northeastern part of Mexico. They do not migrate and are somewhat limited by winter conditions. Severe winters restrict the northern limit of their range, while a mild winter will lead to northward extension of their breeding range. There are seven recognized subspecies of Carolina wren, each having a slightly different song and appearance. Individuals from southern Texas and northeastern Mexico are more boldly barred on the wings and tail and also are barred faintly on the flanks and back. Individuals from southern Mexico and central America are dingy white below with brown upper-parts. The Florida population has individuals that are larger and darker in color. 
 The loud and cheerful song is often times heard before the bird is seen. Both sexes use alarm calls, but only the males sing to advertise territory. Males sing a series of quick whistled notes. These are usually repeated in three parts, “tea – kettle – tea – kettle,” or “Germany – Germany.” 
 The Carolina wren’s diet mostly consists of insects and spiders. They climb and hop up branches, foraging for insects. They use their curved bills to turn over decaying vegetation and hammer larger bugs. Other food items for this bird include: caterpillars, moths, stick bugs, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets and cockroaches. On occasion, these wrens will eat lizards, frogs, or snakes. They also eat a small amount of plant matter, such as fruit pulp and seeds from bayberry, sweetgum or poison ivy. 
 Female Caroling wrens can begin laying eggs as early as March in southern populations and as early as April in northern populations. A pair may bond at any time of the year and will remain together for life. Individuals nesting in the northern part of the range usually raise two broods per year, while pairs in the southern region can raise up to three per year. Pairs stay bonded year- round and do not take a break from defending their territory. Carolina wrens nest in open cavities 3-6 feet off the ground, in trees or other more versatile areas. They may make use of flower pots and mailboxes. Carolina wrens nests have even been found in coat pockets and boots. Both males and females build their nests together. One may stay at the nest site while the other gathers materials. The nest is loosely constructed with a wide variety of materials being used (bark, dried grass, dead leaves, pine needles, hair, paper, string, shed snake skin, plastic). The first nest may take a week or longer to build, while later nests may take only 4 days. Multiple nests may be built before one is selected. The nest is cup-shaped and usually domed having a side entrance. Many times the nest has a woven extension similar to an entry-way or porch. Nests may vary in size, ranging from 3-9 inches long and 3-6 inches wide. 
 The clutch size of the Carolina wren is between 3 and 7 eggs. Egg length is about 0.7 inches long and 0.6 inches wide, and are white/cream or pinkish white with fine rusty-brown spots. Chicks emerge after a 10-16 day incubation period and are covered in pale grayish down. After fledging the nest, family groups will search for food together. 
 Carolina wrens will visit suet-filled feeders and in cold northern winters they will take shelter in nest boxes containing dried grasses. They particularly like boxes with slots rather than holes. During breeding season these wrens may nest in boxes, but are just as likely to choose a hanging plant or brush pile for a nesting site. Consider putting up a nest box to attract a breeding p air. Put the box up well before breeding season and attach a guard to keep out predators. Learn about offering shelter to backyard birds at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/how-to-provide-seeds-and-shelter-for-backyard-birds/. Keeping a brush pile in your yard is a great way to encourage wrens to take up residence there. 

Sources
Dunne, P. (2006). Pete Dunne’s essential field guide companion. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, New York, USA.Image attachment

 

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I love seeing these posts!

6 days ago

Harvey County

Squad goals! 😁 Great work! 💪🥫📦Our Emergency Response Team deployed for an important mission today - boxing up food for the First Responders Holiday Helpers program. Our crew is prettttty easy to spot in these pics.

With the help of Newton KS Police Department and Newton Fire/EMS, we stacked up 16 pallets for Harvey County. That's more than 500 boxes!

There are so many people to thank for making this happen, but most of all, it starts with our communities. The money we helped raise was put toward these boxes of food, and in turn they will be delivered locally to those in need. We are also so, so thankful that Dillons partners with us to do this. They share their staff, supplies and warehouse space for the day to make this possible. It's a great initiative, and we love being a part of it.
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Squad goals! 😁 Great work! 💪🥫📦

6 days ago

Harvey County Sheriff's Office

Our Emergency Response Team deployed for an important mission today - boxing up food for the First Responders Holiday Helpers program. Our crew is prettttty easy to spot in these pics.

With the help of Newton KS Police Department and Newton Fire/EMS, we stacked up 16 pallets for Harvey County. That's more than 500 boxes!

There are so many people to thank for making this happen, but most of all, it starts with our communities. The money we helped raise was put toward these boxes of food, and in turn they will be delivered locally to those in need. We are also so, so thankful that Dillons partners with us to do this. They share their staff, supplies and warehouse space for the day to make this possible. It's a great initiative, and we love being a part of it.
... See moreSee less

 

Comment on Facebook

Awesomeness! Kindness, caring, compassion and selflessness leave everlasting gratitude. Thank you for being people with hearts full of genuine love for your community 💙

A community helping thier people ❤️

Awesome!

This is so awesome, it shows your kindness and big hearts. Thank you for all you do for our community

Thanks guys!! Your kindness makes me happy!!

That is AWESOME!!! Thank you for serving beyond your daily service and God Bless! Be Safe!!!

Thank you so much for doing this.

Great work!

💖💖Thank all of you for doing this 🤗🤗

👏❤️ PTL!!!

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7 days ago

Harvey County Emergency Management

October 2018 flooding in Harvey County. ... See moreSee less

October 2018 flooding in Harvey County.

7 days ago

Harvey County Emergency Management

Harvey County Emergency Management logo ... See moreSee less

Harvey County Emergency Management logo

7 days ago

Harvey County

Yesssss can't wait!!! 👏 👏 🐟 🎣

Harvey County Parks
Today the Harvey County Parks Department crew braved the frozen water and cold temperatures to install this beautiful new fishing dock at Camp Hawk!
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Harvey County Parks

Today the Harvey County Parks Department crew braved the frozen water and cold temperatures to install this beautiful new fishing dock at Camp Hawk! ... See moreSee less

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Hooray!

Very nice err guys

👏

Many more water hookups for this coming season please

I know I'll be there this summer

Yay!!!!

Thank you. Will drive out to see.

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Commission sets county staff holiday schedule for 2019

2018/12/4

The Harvey County Commission has approved 10-1/2 days of public...

Election board completes general election canvass

2018/11/13

Harvey County finished counting votes for the November general election...

Advanced voting for general election begins Oct. 23 in Harvey County

2018/10/22

Advanced voting for the November general election begins Tuesday, Oct...

Tax foreclosure sale scheduled for November

2018/10/12

A tax foreclosure sale will be held for several properties...

Commissioner signs local disaster declaration for flooding

2018/10/9

Harvey County Commission Chair Randy Hague signed a local disaster...

October marks National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

2018/10/3

Americans are spending more time online than ever before. As...

County introduces new resource for meeting documents

2018/09/28

This summer, Harvey County began researching opportunities to find a...

Clerk's Office finalizes primary election results

2018/08/13

The primary election wrapped up in Harvey County on Aug...

Commission presents recommended budget for 2019 fiscal year

2018/07/16

The Harvey County Commission has moved forward with its recommended...

Welcome to Harvey County

Nearly 35,000 residents call Harvey County home. The county landscape pairs picturesque country living with vibrant downtown shopping centers. Harvey County serves the cities of Burrton, Halstead, Hesston, Newton, North Newton, Sedgwick, and Walton, as well as 15 townships.

Harvey County is home to a bustling airport and train service, innovative economic leaders, sprawling parks, and welcoming school districts. Food and entertainment opportunities abound, with even more amenities within a short driving distance to our friendly neighboring counties.

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  • Wheat Field
  • Riverside Park bridge
  • Blue Sky Sculpture 4
  • Sedgwick Cardinals 1
  • King Park