Total cases in Kansas
(as of Nov. 27)
153,021
Total cases in Harvey County
(as of Nov. 27)
1,450
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Harvey County News

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Posts

We want to say thank you to the folks at Grace Community Church, and everyone else involved in the annual Community Thanksgiving Dinner, for providing meals for our staff today. Happy Thanksgiving! ... See moreSee less

Harvey County Health Department will be closed Friday,
Nov 27.
... See moreSee less

In observance of Thanksgiving the Harvey County Parks office will be closed on Thursday November 26 and Friday November 27, 2020.
Have a happy and safe Thanksgiving!
... See moreSee less

Harvey County Health Department will be closed Thursday and Friday,
Nov 26 & 27.
... See moreSee less

Photos from Kansas Department of Health and Environment's postPhotos from Kansas Department of Health and Environment's post ... See moreSee less

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CRITTER OF THE WEEK!
Red Milkweed Beetle
Tetraopes tetrophthalmus
The Red milkweed beetle is a brightly colored insect that can be seen wherever its host plant, common milkweed is found. Their range matches the native distribution of Common milkweed. This means that they are mostly found in the Northeastern quadrant of North America. They are easily identified by their bright red carapace, black oval markings, and long antennae. They are sometimes called milkweed borers and Four-eyed beetles. Both their species and genus name means four eyed. Their antenna divides each compound eye, giving them a lower and upper eye. Many insects that feed on the milkweed plant are brightly colored. They are all using a defense mechanism called aposematism. The black and red, much like the black and orange of the monarch butterflies warns predators of their toxicity and bitter taste. Insects that eat the milkweed plant sequester cardiac glycosides making them taste very bad, and making predators that eat them sick. You may find Red milkweed beetles and other insects like monarch caterpillars on the same plant. That’s not a problem. These beetles are herbivores and will not harm monarch eggs or larvae. Early in the summer, after mating, females lay their eggs low on a stem of milkweed or very close by. These eggs hatch and the larvae migrate to the roots of the milkweed plant. If the eggs are laid on the stem the larvae can travel under the plants skin. When eggs aren’t laid on the host plant, larvae must tunnel through the soil. They eat the roots of the plant, and when its time, they overwinter there. When spring arrives, they may feed a bit more on the roots. They then create an earthen chamber to pupate in. At the beginning of the summer, they emerge as adults. Adult Red milkweed beetles eat leaves, buds and flowers of the milkweed plant. The Red milkweed beetle pictured here was found at Harvey County East Park on June 19, 2020.CRITTER OF THE WEEK!
Red Milkweed Beetle
Tetraopes tetrophthalmus
The Red milkweed beetle is a brightly colored insect that can be seen wherever its host plant, common milkweed is found. Their range matches the native distribution of Common milkweed. This means that they are mostly found in the Northeastern quadrant of North America. They are easily identified by their bright red carapace, black oval markings, and long antennae. They are sometimes called milkweed borers and Four-eyed beetles. Both their species and genus name means four eyed. Their antenna divides each compound eye, giving them a lower and upper eye. Many insects that feed on the milkweed plant are brightly colored. They are all using a defense mechanism called aposematism. The black and red, much like the black and orange of the monarch butterflies warns predators of their toxicity and bitter taste. Insects that eat the milkweed plant sequester cardiac glycosides making them taste very bad, and making predators that eat them sick. You may find Red milkweed beetles and other insects like monarch caterpillars on the same plant. That’s not a problem. These beetles are herbivores and will not harm monarch eggs or larvae. Early in the summer, after mating, females lay their eggs low on a stem of milkweed or very close by. These eggs hatch and the larvae migrate to the roots of the milkweed plant. If the eggs are laid on the stem the larvae can travel under the plants skin. When eggs aren’t laid on the host plant, larvae must tunnel through the soil. They eat the roots of the plant, and when its time, they overwinter there. When spring arrives, they may feed a bit more on the roots. They then create an earthen chamber to pupate in. At the beginning of the summer, they emerge as adults. Adult Red milkweed beetles eat leaves, buds and flowers of the milkweed plant. The Red milkweed beetle pictured here was found at Harvey County East Park on June 19, 2020.
... See moreSee less

CRITTER OF THE WEEK!
Red Milkweed Beetle 
Tetraopes tetrophthalmus 
 The Red milkweed beetle is a brightly colored insect that can be seen wherever its host plant, common milkweed is found. Their range matches the native distribution of Common milkweed. This means that they are mostly found in the Northeastern quadrant of North America. They are easily identified by their bright red carapace, black oval markings, and long antennae. They are sometimes called milkweed borers and Four-eyed beetles. Both their species and genus name means four eyed. Their antenna divides each compound eye, giving them a lower and upper eye. Many insects that feed on the milkweed plant are brightly colored. They are all using a defense mechanism called aposematism. The black and red, much like the black and orange of the monarch butterflies warns predators of their toxicity and bitter taste. Insects that eat the milkweed plant sequester cardiac glycosides making them taste very bad, and making predators that eat them sick. You may find Red milkweed beetles and other insects like monarch caterpillars on the same plant. That’s not a problem. These beetles are herbivores and will not harm monarch eggs or larvae. Early in the summer, after mating, females lay their eggs low on a stem of milkweed or very close by. These eggs hatch and the larvae migrate to the roots of the milkweed plant. If the eggs are laid on the stem the larvae can travel under the plants skin. When eggs aren’t laid on the host plant, larvae must tunnel through the soil. They eat the roots of the plant, and when its time, they overwinter there. When spring arrives, they may feed a bit more on the roots. They then create an earthen chamber to pupate in. At the beginning of the summer, they emerge as adults. Adult Red milkweed beetles eat leaves, buds and flowers of the milkweed plant. The Red milkweed beetle pictured here was found at Harvey County East Park on June 19, 2020.

Start your New Years Resolutions a month early? #bcbskspathways #healthyksNewton Recreation Commission's cover photo ... See moreSee less

Start your New Years Resolutions a month early? #bcbskspathways #healthyks

3 days ago

Harvey County

The Harvey County Courthouse is closed Nov. 26-27 for the Thanksgiving holiday break. The Courthouse will reopen Nov. 30 at 8 a.m.

The next holiday closing is Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, at noon.
... See moreSee less

The Harvey County Courthouse is closed Nov. 26-27 for the Thanksgiving holiday break. The Courthouse will reopen Nov. 30 at 8 a.m.

The next holiday closing is Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, at noon.

Good advice to read over and keep in mind over the holidays! 🦃Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by Christmas Day, the day before Thanksgiving, Easter, and Christmas Eve. In 2018, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 1,630 home cooking fires on Thanksgiving. Here are some safety tips to keep you and your family safe.

• Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the
stovetop so you can keep an eye on the food.

• Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check
on it frequently.

• Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be
hot and kids should stay 3 feet away.

• Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids.
The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee
could cause serious burns.

• Keep the floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys,
pocketbooks or bags.

• Keep knives out of the reach of children.

• Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee
maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the
counter within easy reach of a child.

• Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of
children — up high in a locked cabinet.

• Never leave children alone in room with a lit candle.

• Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them
by pushing the test button.
... See moreSee less

Good advice to read over and keep in mind over the holidays! 🦃

Photos from Harvey County's postPhotos from Harvey County's post ... See moreSee less

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Photos from Harvey County's postPhotos from Harvey County's post ... See moreSee less

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4 days ago

Harvey County

The Harvey County Commission implemented a local health to limit mass gatherings in Harvey County to 10 individuals. The Commission, which serves as the Local Board of Health, voted to approve the order at its Nov. 24 meeting.

The order requires gatherings be limited to 10 individuals where 6 feet of distance cannot be maintained. It does not limit the occupancy allowed in a facility or event if 6 feet of distance can be maintained between groups at all times.

The order will go into effect Nov. 25 at 12:01 a.m., and will remain through Jan. 5, 2021.

"Our regional medical and health care systems are simply overwhelmed. We are on a dangerous trajectory if we cannot slow the spread of COVID-19," said Dr. Doyle Detweiler, public health officer for Harvey County. "We recognize the importance of the holidays. For the sake of our medical community, we urge you to keep gatherings small."

Additionally, a local health order remains in effect that requires individuals to wear a face mask over their nose and mouth in any indoor or outdoor public space where 6 feet of distance cannot be maintained. That order is in place until rescinded, superseded or amended.

More info on the local health order regarding mass gatherings can be found here: www.harveycounty.com/542-news/harvey-county-news/659-county-commission-sets-mass-gathering-limit-...Photos from Harvey County's post
... See moreSee less

The Harvey County Commission implemented a local health to limit mass gatherings in Harvey County to 10 individuals. The Commission, which serves as the Local Board of Health, voted to approve the order at its Nov. 24 meeting.

The order requires gatherings be limited to 10 individuals where 6 feet of distance cannot be maintained. It does not limit the occupancy allowed in a facility or event if 6 feet of distance can be maintained between groups at all times. 

The order will go into effect Nov. 25 at 12:01 a.m., and will remain through Jan. 5, 2021. 

Our regional medical and health care systems are simply overwhelmed. We are on a dangerous trajectory if we cannot slow the spread of COVID-19, said Dr. Doyle Detweiler, public health officer for Harvey County. We recognize the importance of the holidays. For the sake of our medical community, we urge you to keep gatherings small.

Additionally, a local health order remains in effect that requires individuals to wear a face mask over their nose and mouth in any indoor or outdoor public space where 6 feet of distance cannot be maintained. That order is in place until rescinded, superseded or amended. 

More info on the local health order regarding mass gatherings can be found here: https://www.harveycounty.com/542-news/harvey-county-news/659-county-commission-sets-mass-gathering-limit-at-10.htmlImage attachment

5 days ago

Harvey County

Here is the Nov. 23 update from the Harvey County Health Department regarding cases of COVID-19 in Harvey County:

▪️ Cases to date: 1,272 (218 new cases since Nov. 16)
▪️ Recovered to date: 936 (188 recovered since Nov. 16)
▪️ Known active cases: 327 (Up 30 since Nov. 16)
▪️ Deaths to date: 9
▪️ Current hospitalizations: 20
▪️ People tested to date: 8,553 (573 new people tested since Nov. 16)
▪️ Total PCR tests to date: 13,237 (1,153 new PCR tests since Nov. 16)

Additional statistical and demographic information can be found at any time on our COVID-19 dashboard: www.harveycounty.com/covid19stats

Our cases include confirmed and probable cases. There are 982 confirmed and 290 probable cases. Positive antigen tests are considered probable cases by the state, while positive PCR tests are considered confirmed cases.

Here is county case data for surrounding counties, as reported by local county data:

🔸 Sedgwick: 21,625 cases (149 deaths)
🔸 Reno: 4,152 cases (3,048 recovered, 44 deaths)
🔸 Butler: 1,917 cases (1,563 recovered, 8 deaths)
🔸 McPherson: 1,248 cases (629 recovered, 9 deaths)
🔸 Marion: 420 cases (345 recovered, 2 deaths)

As we have stressed, local health resources are significantly strained due to continued rapid spread of COVID-19. This has challenged hospitals in our region. It also has slowed the Health Department's ability to contact trace and do case investigation. While we continue to make every effort to do this as soon as possible, the substantial, sharp rise in active cases delays our ability to do so.

If you are sick with symptoms of COVID-19, stay home and contact your medical provider for further guidance. If you are tested for COVID-19, you need to quarantine until you receive your test result. If you are notified you are positive for COVID-19, please begin to isolate for 10 days. If you are a close contact of a positive case, please begin to quarantine.
... See moreSee less

1 week ago

Harvey County

Your medical community needs your help.
Your first responders need your help.
Your schools need your help.
Your long-term care facilities need your help.
Your community needs your help.

These are small efforts we can all do that cumulatively have a big impact on reducing the spread of COVID-19.
... See moreSee less

Here's a little look back at history for ya. The groundbreaking for the Harvey County Detention Center was held 25 years ago today, Nov. 20, 1995.

The Detention Center was completed and opened in 1997. It hasn't changed too much over the years - but it's quite different than the first Harvey County Jail, which opened in 1880!Photos from Harvey County Sheriff's Office's post
... See moreSee less

***UPDATE*** PHONES ARE NOT OPERATING.
Our office phones are currently out of order. Please message us on here or email kmiller@harveycounty.com with any inquiries.
... See moreSee less

Camping season is over 😢, and it was a crazy one for us. But, that means it is time to start up "Critter of the Week" again! This week Naturalist Rachel has picked the Clouded Sulphur Butterfly as her subject. If you have a critter (fauna or flora) that you are interested in feel free to drop us a message and we will do our best to feature it. We do ask that you we keep all subjects native to Kansas.

Clouded Sulphur
Colius philodice
The clouded Sulphur is a delicate butterfly that can be seen throughout the state of Kansas from March until December depending on the weather. This pale yellow insect is the state’s most common yellow butterfly. It is a medium-sized butterfly that was named after the yellow nonmetal, Sulphur. Adults of this species love dandelions, and larva enjoy eating white clover. They are an important prey item for a number of animals and they also pollinate many types of flowers. Newly emerged individuals have a thin pink border around their wings. Females may vary in color, and can be bright yellow or greenish white. It is not uncommon to see a white form female. They can be differentiated from other white butterflies by the dark outer wing edges. Male clouded sulphurs are typically a brighter yellow than the females. Both genders have a double white spot on their forewing. This is usually more pronounced on males, with a dark border. In the summer time, these butterflies are larger than they are in the spring or fall. The orange Sulphur butterfly looks a lot like the clouded Sulphur, except the clouded Sulphur does not have orange on its upper wings. The Clouded Sulphur is sometimes confused with the cloudless Sulphur butterfly. We do see the cloudless Sulphur in Kansas, but they are much less common. The cloudless sulphur is more abundant in southern states and in Mexico. Also, the cloudless Sulphur is larger (2-2 ¾ inches) and a brighter yellow. Clouded Sulphur butterflies are typically seen flying low near meadows and gardens. Adults use a large variety of nectar sources for food, and the larva prefer clover, alfalfa, and vetch species. After mating, females will lay a single egg on a host plant. The egg is yellow at first but later turns crimson. Eggs hatch after about 5 days. Larva are green with a dark stripe down their back, and white lateral stripes on their sides. Larva feed on host plants until they are full grown. This usually takes 3 weeks and afterwards the non-wintering generation spends about 10 days in chrysalis before becoming an adult. The overwintering generation spends the entire winter in chrysalis form, and emerges in the spring. The butterfly pictured here was spotted on March 2, 2020.Camping season is over 😢, and it was a crazy one for us. But, that means it is time to start up "Critter of the Week" again! This week Naturalist Rachel has picked the Clouded Sulphur Butterfly as her subject. If you have a critter (fauna or flora) that you are interested in feel free to drop us a message and we will do our best to feature it. We do ask that you we keep all subjects native to Kansas.

Clouded Sulphur
Colius philodice
The clouded Sulphur is a delicate butterfly that can be seen throughout the state of Kansas from March until December depending on the weather. This pale yellow insect is the state’s most common yellow butterfly. It is a medium-sized butterfly that was named after the yellow nonmetal, Sulphur. Adults of this species love dandelions, and larva enjoy eating white clover. They are an important prey item for a number of animals and they also pollinate many types of flowers. Newly emerged individuals have a thin pink border around their wings. Females may vary in color, and can be bright yellow or greenish white. It is not uncommon to see a white form female. They can be differentiated from other white butterflies by the dark outer wing edges. Male clouded sulphurs are typically a brighter yellow than the females. Both genders have a double white spot on their forewing. This is usually more pronounced on males, with a dark border. In the summer time, these butterflies are larger than they are in the spring or fall. The orange Sulphur butterfly looks a lot like the clouded Sulphur, except the clouded Sulphur does not have orange on its upper wings. The Clouded Sulphur is sometimes confused with the cloudless Sulphur butterfly. We do see the cloudless Sulphur in Kansas, but they are much less common. The cloudless sulphur is more abundant in southern states and in Mexico. Also, the cloudless Sulphur is larger (2-2 ¾ inches) and a brighter yellow. Clouded Sulphur butterflies are typically seen flying low near meadows and gardens. Adults use a large variety of nectar sources for food, and the larva prefer clover, alfalfa, and vetch species. After mating, females will lay a single egg on a host plant. The egg is yellow at first but later turns crimson. Eggs hatch after about 5 days. Larva are green with a dark stripe down their back, and white lateral stripes on their sides. Larva feed on host plants until they are full grown. This usually takes 3 weeks and afterwards the non-wintering generation spends about 10 days in chrysalis before becoming an adult. The overwintering generation spends the entire winter in chrysalis form, and emerges in the spring. The butterfly pictured here was spotted on March 2, 2020.
... See moreSee less

Camping season is over 😢, and it was a crazy one for us.  But, that means it is time to start up Critter of the Week again!  This week Naturalist Rachel has picked the Clouded Sulphur Butterfly as her subject.  If you have a critter (fauna or flora) that you are interested in feel free to drop us a message and we will do our best to feature it.  We do ask that you we keep all subjects native to Kansas.

Clouded Sulphur
Colius philodice 
 The clouded Sulphur is a delicate butterfly that can be seen throughout the state of Kansas from March until December depending on the weather. This pale yellow insect is the state’s most common yellow butterfly. It is a medium-sized butterfly that was named after the yellow nonmetal, Sulphur. Adults of this species love dandelions, and larva enjoy eating white clover. They are an important prey item for a number of animals and they also pollinate many types of flowers. Newly emerged individuals have a thin pink border around their wings.  Females may vary in color, and can be bright yellow or greenish white. It is not uncommon to see a white form female. They can be differentiated from other white butterflies by the dark outer wing edges. Male clouded sulphurs are typically a brighter yellow than the females. Both genders have a double white spot on their forewing. This is usually more pronounced on males, with a dark border.  In the summer time, these butterflies are larger than they are in the spring or fall.  The orange Sulphur butterfly looks a lot like the clouded Sulphur, except the clouded Sulphur does not have orange on its upper wings. The Clouded Sulphur is sometimes confused with the cloudless Sulphur butterfly. We do see the cloudless Sulphur in Kansas, but they are much less common. The cloudless sulphur is more abundant in southern states and in Mexico. Also, the cloudless Sulphur is larger (2-2 ¾ inches) and a brighter yellow. Clouded Sulphur butterflies are typically seen flying low near meadows and gardens. Adults use a large variety of nectar sources for food, and the larva prefer clover, alfalfa, and vetch species. After mating, females will lay a single egg on a host plant. The egg is yellow at first but later turns crimson. Eggs hatch after about 5 days. Larva are green with a dark stripe down their back, and white lateral stripes on their sides. Larva feed on host plants until they are full grown. This usually takes 3 weeks and afterwards the non-wintering generation spends about 10 days in chrysalis before becoming an adult. The overwintering generation spends the entire winter in chrysalis form, and emerges in the spring. The butterfly pictured here was spotted on March 2, 2020.

Our office will join many other law enforcement agencies across the state, including the Kansas Highway Patrol, in the Kansas Thanksgiving Safe Arrival traffic enforcement campaign Nov. 20-29. While all traffic laws will be enforced, this effort will specifically target and remove impaired drivers from our roads.

According to the Kansas Department of Transportation, the day before Thanksgiving sees more impairment-related crashes than any other day of the year. Those who choose to drive under the influence of alcohol or other drugs are a danger to all they share the road with - their passengers, other motorists and their passengers, bicyclists and pedestrians.

Impaired driving crashes tend to be more severe. On average in Kansas, three people are injured every day, and one person is killed every four days, in alcohol- or drug-related crashes. Vehicle occupants in alcohol- or drug-related crashes are more than 2-1/2 times more likely to be injured or killed than those involved in crashes where alcohol or other drugs were not a factor.

Each week in Kansas, more than 250 drivers are arrested for choosing to drive impaired. A DUI conviction will result in jail time, the suspension or revocation of driver's license, a fine of $500 to $2,500, alcohol or drug treatment programming, and the purchase and installation of an ignition interlock device by the offender if alcohol is cited as a contributing factor.

Grant funding from KDOT is helping support these efforts across the state.Our office will join many other law enforcement agencies across the state, including the Kansas Highway Patrol, in the Kansas Thanksgiving Safe Arrival traffic enforcement campaign Nov. 20-29. While all traffic laws will be enforced, this effort will specifically target and remove impaired drivers from our roads.

According to the Kansas Department of Transportation, the day before Thanksgiving sees more impairment-related crashes than any other day of the year. Those who choose to drive under the influence of alcohol or other drugs are a danger to all they share the road with - their passengers, other motorists and their passengers, bicyclists and pedestrians.

Impaired driving crashes tend to be more severe. On average in Kansas, three people are injured every day, and one person is killed every four days, in alcohol- or drug-related crashes. Vehicle occupants in alcohol- or drug-related crashes are more than 2-1/2 times more likely to be injured or killed than those involved in crashes where alcohol or other drugs were not a factor.

Each week in Kansas, more than 250 drivers are arrested for choosing to drive impaired. A DUI conviction will result in jail time, the suspension or revocation of driver's license, a fine of $500 to $2,500, alcohol or drug treatment programming, and the purchase and installation of an ignition interlock device by the offender if alcohol is cited as a contributing factor.

Grant funding from KDOT is helping support these efforts across the state.
... See moreSee less

Our office will join many other law enforcement agencies across the state, including the Kansas Highway Patrol, in the Kansas Thanksgiving Safe Arrival traffic enforcement campaign Nov. 20-29. While all traffic laws will be enforced, this effort will specifically target and remove impaired drivers from our roads.

According to the Kansas Department of Transportation, the day before Thanksgiving sees more impairment-related crashes than any other day of the year. Those who choose to drive under the influence of alcohol or other drugs are a danger to all they share the road with - their passengers, other motorists and their passengers, bicyclists and pedestrians.

Impaired driving crashes tend to be more severe. On average in Kansas, three people are injured every day, and one person is killed every four days, in alcohol- or drug-related crashes. Vehicle occupants in alcohol- or drug-related crashes are more than 2-1/2 times more likely to be injured or killed than those involved in crashes where alcohol or other drugs were not a factor.

Each week in Kansas, more than 250 drivers are arrested for choosing to drive impaired. A DUI conviction will result in jail time, the suspension or revocation of drivers license, a fine of $500 to $2,500, alcohol or drug treatment programming, and the purchase and installation of an ignition interlock device by the offender if alcohol is cited as a contributing factor.

Grant funding from KDOT is helping support these efforts across the state.

Very dangerous grassland fire danger levels will affect much of the region today due to warm temperatures, lower humidity levels, and very strong south winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph. Avoid outdoor burning today. ... See moreSee less

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County commission sets mass gathering limit at 10

2020/11/24

The Harvey County Commission implemented a local health order to...

Election board completes 2020 general election canvass

2020/11/12

The results of the 2020 general election have been finalized...

Commission reimplements Phase Three of health reopening plan

2020/11/10

The Harvey County Commission voted to move back to Phase...

Commission sets public holidays for 2021

2020/11/5

The Harvey County Commission set its public holidays for 2021...

Voting information in Harvey County

2020/10/20

The United States is holding a general election. Registered voters...

County extends local face mask order until rescinded

2020/10/20

The Harvey County Commission voted unanimously (2-0) at its Oct...

Harvey County CARES Act grant opportunities

2020/09/24

The State of Kansas has made emergency relief funding available...

County commission extends face mask order through Oct. 19

2020/09/15

(Sept. 15, 2020)The Harvey County Commission voted unanimously at its...

Committee outlines local CARES Act funding allocations

2020/08/17

The Harvey County Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES)...

Welcome to Harvey County

Nearly 35,000 residents call Harvey County home. The county landscape pairs picturesque country living with vibrant downtown shopping centers. Harvey County serves the cities of Burrton, Halstead, Hesston, Newton, North Newton, Sedgwick, and Walton, as well as 15 townships.

Harvey County is home to a bustling airport and train service, innovative economic leaders, sprawling parks, and welcoming school districts. Food and entertainment opportunities abound, with even more amenities within a short driving distance to our friendly neighboring counties.

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  • Wheat Field
  • Riverside Park bridge
  • Blue Sky Sculpture 4
  • Sedgwick Cardinals 1
  • King Park