Confirmed cases in Kansas
(as of April 8)
1,046
Confirmed cases in Harvey County
(as of April 8)
4
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Harvey County News

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Sand Creek Summer DazeSizzlin 5K will feature chip timing attached to these "tubular" 80's bibs! Re-live the past or experience the "rad" 80's fashion! This years race will start at 8:00 am. Register for the Saturday, August 15 race at: secure.getmeregistered.com/get_information.php?event_id=134043 ... See moreSee less

8 hours ago

Harvey County

COVID-19 statistics from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for April 8:

◽️ There have been 1,046 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state, an increase of 146 from the day prior.
◽️ Harvey County remains at four cases, with two of those individuals recovered.

Wash your hands, practice social distancing, and stay home except for the essentials.
... See moreSee less

COVID-19 statistics from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for April 8:

◽️ There have been 1,046 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state, an increase of 146 from the day prior.
◽️ Harvey County remains at four cases, with two of those individuals recovered.

Wash your hands, practice social distancing, and stay home except for the essentials.

My Life My Quit
Text or call 1-855-891-9989 to quit vaping or smoking.
#kdhecdrr #healthyks
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My Life My Quit
Text or call 1-855-891-9989 to quit vaping or smoking.
#kdhecdrr #healthyks

National Public Health Week is great time to thank the many volunteers who assist our communities to stay safe! ... See moreSee less

National Public Health Week is great time to thank the many volunteers who assist our communities to stay safe!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=vh_YbK8N3Rc&list=PLUdL3XGccEJE0ECo97SKkAngB-0Ud30ZF&index=4Curriculum and other resources for educators can also be found at the Kids a Cooking' website www.kidsacookin.ksu.edu in both English and Spanish. Jus... ... See moreSee less

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Beans and More BeansFor more tips and techniques, go to our website at: www.kidsacookin.ksu.edu. Videos and recipes are available in both English and Spanish. Produced by... ... See moreSee less

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13 hours ago

Harvey County

Our local first responders have always been awesome about educating our communities on what tools and gear they might use when responding to a call. We want to do the same with how first responders help an individual with COVID-19 symptoms. First responders will always be here to help you when you need them, but right now it just might be with a few extra pieces of personal protective equipment. Newton Fire/EMS Division Chief of Training Phil Beebe helps us get familiar with how first responders prepare for a potential call. ... See moreSee less

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Thank you Phil!

We in Newton thank and love you all!

It's National Public Health Week!

Did you know that your health department is working with many local groups to focus on mental health and violence prevention?
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Its National Public Health Week!

Did you know that your health department is working with many local groups to focus on mental health and violence prevention?

Newton Convention & Visitors BureauHistory seems to be a popular topic! Today's safe social distancing is a blog post about the history of the buildings in the 400 block of Main, which are some of Newton's oldest. Grab a pair of shoes and enjoy the sun, or simply follow along from the comfort of your house. Click here to take the virtual stroll: tonewton.com/blog/safe-distancing-idea-april-7 ... See moreSee less

Kansas Department of Health and EnvironmentNeed groceries or other household supplies? If curbside pick-up or home delivery isn't an option, follow these seven tips to protect the health of all.
🔻 Shop only when necessary.
🔻 Send one person to shop.
🔻 No self-serve food or drinks.
🔻 Only touch what you buy.
🔻 Practice social distancing.
🔻 Avoid cash transactions.
🔻 Wash your hands when you get home.
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1 day ago

Harvey County

Today's update on COVID-19 in our state:

▪️ Kansas has 900 presumptive-positive cases of COVID-19, with 55 new since yesterday.

▪️ Harvey County has had four cases, of which two individuals have recovered.
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Todays update on COVID-19 in our state:

▪️ Kansas has 900 presumptive-positive cases of COVID-19, with 55 new since yesterday.

▪️ Harvey County has had four cases, of which two individuals have recovered.

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Compared to NYC, New Orleans, etc that's not horrible. I feel that as a whole that means we are following guidelines. Going up at a slower curve

Because nothing open to go out too so we stay home like the order says. Grocery stores or food or mini stops are essential.

Need meal help? Have you tried beans?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LeEBExDjac&list=PLUdL3XGccEJE0ECo97SKkAngB-0Ud30ZFFor more tips and techniques, go to our website at: www.kidsacookin.ksu.edu. Videos and recipes are available in both English and Spanish. Produced by...
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2 days ago

Harvey County

The Harvey County Health Department has confirmed its fourth presumptive-positive case of coronavirus, or COVID-19, in Harvey County. However, this individual has actually already completed the Kansas Department of Health and Environment's criteria for recovery.

The individual - a man in his 50s - had known out-of-state travel, and had been in self-quarantine. The KDHE requires COVID-19 patients to self-isolate for seven days after onset or 72 hours after resolution of fever, whichever is longer. The man completed that criteria while awaiting results from a private lab. The health department will still follow up on any potential contacts.

As of this morning, the KDHE had confirmed 845 presumptive-positive cases of COVID-19 in Kansas. As a reminder, presumptive-positive cases are essentially confirmed - they are verified by a second test at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Please keep doing your part to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Stay home. Stay safe. Stay healthy.
... See moreSee less

The Harvey County Health Department has confirmed its fourth presumptive-positive case of coronavirus, or COVID-19, in Harvey County. However, this individual has actually already completed the Kansas Department of Health and Environments criteria for recovery.

The individual - a man in his 50s - had known out-of-state travel, and had been in self-quarantine. The KDHE requires COVID-19 patients to self-isolate for seven days after onset or 72 hours after resolution of fever, whichever is longer. The man completed that criteria while awaiting results from a private lab. The health department will still follow up on any potential contacts.

As of this morning, the KDHE had confirmed 845 presumptive-positive cases of COVID-19 in Kansas. As a reminder, presumptive-positive cases are essentially confirmed - they are verified by a second test at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Please keep doing your part to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Stay home. Stay safe. Stay healthy.

Comment on Facebook

It is not Newton Health Department who is conducting the test that take weeks to get back so please stop blaming them!! They just administer and sent to the lab. Now think of this if the lab they send to has 20 employees and each test takes 2 hours to prep for testing. Followed by 1 week of incubation time to verify it. In a perfect world they receive 20 samples every 2 hours. However in the real world they get probably 5000 a delivery. Now I know of 3 different deliver options USPS,UPS, and FedEx. So that is a possibility of 15000 minimum a day. I would assume they run multiple shifts to continue testing 24 hrs a day. You do the math folks they are getting more than they can keep up with and it's only gonna get worse.

Eeeeks, that says a lot when he had completed his quarantine before results were received. Glad he recovered!! That is what 2 or 3 of the 4 cases here that are now recovered?

Why don’t we have the 45 min test here or the 5 min test gotta wait a week to know if your sick how pathetic

Is there a place anyone knows where you can report someone who is supposed to be quarantined for out of state travel from Colorado but is very obviously defying the order?

No testing for negative test? But if it takes a week geez. Why is not 2 weeks ? The virus can shed even if not having symptoms! This is going to be a problem for Ks.

Thank you for letting us know. Please, everyone stay safe.

Think we are doing just fine.

Wow just wow...what is up with the testing? Smh

Results are taking way to long..by the time you receive the results the person is more then likely pretty close to being over it..funny how some people have the results in a short amount of time and others have to wait a week and a half..makes no sense

Food & Farm Council will meet virtually on
Monday, April 6 at 4:00PM.

Join by calling +1 312 626 6799
Meeting ID: 215 246 969
... See moreSee less

Food & Farm Council will meet virtually on
Monday, April 6 at 4:00PM.

Join by calling +1 312 626 6799
Meeting ID: 215 246 969
... See moreSee less

Looking for something to do outside while practicing social distancing? Here is a great idea from Park Naturalist Rachel.

Gardening for Monarchs
Every year, monarch butterflies migrate from the eastern provinces of Canada and the United States to the Transvolcanic Mountains of central Mexico where they overwinter in clusters in the Oyamel fir forests. Monarch reproduction begins shortly after the overwintering monarchs begin to move north at the end of February and continues until around November when the remainder of butterflies in the last generation join the migration in Texas and Mexico. Their journey is astonishing, and considered to be one of the world’s greatest natural wonders.
After mating, female monarchs search for milkweeds. Milkweeds and a few other plants in the same plant family are the only kind of plant that monarchs will lay eggs on, because it is the only plant that their larva can eat. These plants are known for their milky sap, and unique flowers. When larvae eat milkweed, they ingest the plants toxins (cardiac glycosides). They are able to sequester these compounds in their wings and exoskeletons, making themselves unpalatable to predators. Monarchs use more than 30 milkweed species as a host plant. The most common species of milkweed utilized by monarchs is common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), which easily establishes in disturbed areas like roadsides and fields. Most milkweeds are perennial plants, and grow back each year from rootstock instead of from seed alone. Monarchs also require nectar plants as adults. Nectar plants are their source of carbohydrates, amino acids, and some salt. Without these resources, monarch butterflies could not migrate or reproduce.
Historically, in the Midwest milkweed plants were widespread. Habitat destruction has reduced their range and numbers dramatically. Roads, housing developments, agricultural expansion and herbicide use all contribute to the declining monarch population. In the United States, thousands of acres are converted to development each day. Also, chemically intensive herbicides and insecticides kill monarchs and their host plants. The use of “Roundup ready” soybeans that are genetically engineered to resist Roundup (glyphosate, the worlds’ most widely used herbicide), has resulted in the loss of at least 100 million acres of monarch habitat in row crops since 1997. This allows growers to spray fields with the herbicide instead of tilling to control weeds. Milkweeds survive tilling but not the repeated use of glyphosate. Frequent mowing eliminates milkweed plants, and monarchs are also killed outright by many pesticides. Their overwintering sites have also shrunk dramatically due to illegal logging and thinning of forest sites.
To help the monarch population, you can create and protect monarch habitats. This can be as simple as adding milkweed and nectar sources to an existing garden or maintaining natural habitats with milkweed. When planning your garden or restoration area, it is important to plant milkweed species that are native to your region of the country. Native plants typically require less maintenance and are more beneficial to local wildlife. Harvey County, Kansas is considered to be in the northeast eco region for milkweed. In this region, milkweed species that are preferred by monarchs and easy to establish are: common milkweed, swamp milkweed, butterfly milkweed, and poke milkweed. If started from seed indoors, allow 4-8 weeks growing time before transplanting outdoors. Seeds of most milkweed species need to be stratified before planting. This means that they need to be cold treated for 3-6 weeks before planting. Without stratification, the percentage of seeds that germinate is usually low. Stratification can be accomplished by placing seeds in moist paper towels (in a baggie or other container) and left in the refrigerator. No effort is too small. Your garden can be a few plants on a patio, or many plants across acres of land. Pictured here is a bright orange butterfly milkweed plant at Harvey County West Park, a tagged monarch with swamp milkweed at East Park, and a fifth instar monarch caterpillar eating a Common milkweed leaf at the Osage nature trails.
For more information about monarch conservation and how to garden for monarchs, visit www.monarchwatch.org.
Additional information about monarchs can be found at
www.monarchjointventure.org.
Join other citizen scientist to collect long-term data on larval monarch populations and milkweed habitat www.mlmp.org.
... See moreSee less

Looking for something to do outside while practicing social distancing?  Here is a great idea from Park Naturalist Rachel.

Gardening for Monarchs 
Every year, monarch butterflies migrate from the eastern provinces of Canada and the United States to the Transvolcanic Mountains of central Mexico where they overwinter in clusters in the Oyamel fir forests. Monarch reproduction begins shortly after the overwintering monarchs begin to move north at the end of February and continues until around November when the remainder of butterflies in the last generation join the migration in Texas and Mexico. Their journey is astonishing, and considered to be one of the world’s greatest natural wonders. 
After mating, female monarchs search for milkweeds. Milkweeds and a few other plants in the same plant family are the only kind of plant that monarchs will lay eggs on, because it is the only plant that their larva can eat. These plants are known for their milky sap, and unique flowers. When larvae eat milkweed, they ingest the plants toxins (cardiac glycosides). They are able to sequester these compounds in their wings and exoskeletons, making themselves unpalatable to predators. Monarchs use more than 30 milkweed species as a host plant. The most common species of milkweed utilized by monarchs is common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), which easily establishes in disturbed areas like roadsides and fields. Most milkweeds are perennial plants, and grow back each year from rootstock instead of from seed alone. Monarchs also require nectar plants as adults. Nectar plants are their source of carbohydrates, amino acids, and some salt. Without these resources, monarch butterflies could not migrate or reproduce.
Historically, in the Midwest milkweed plants were widespread. Habitat destruction has reduced their range and numbers dramatically. Roads, housing developments, agricultural expansion and herbicide use all contribute to the declining monarch population. In the United States, thousands of acres are converted to development each day. Also, chemically intensive herbicides and insecticides kill monarchs and their host plants. The use of “Roundup ready” soybeans that are genetically engineered to resist Roundup (glyphosate, the worlds’ most widely used herbicide), has resulted in the loss of at least 100 million acres of monarch habitat in row crops since 1997. This allows growers to spray fields with the herbicide instead of tilling to control weeds. Milkweeds survive tilling but not the repeated use of glyphosate. Frequent mowing eliminates milkweed plants, and monarchs are also killed outright by many pesticides. Their overwintering sites have also shrunk dramatically due to illegal logging and thinning of forest sites. 
To help the monarch population, you can create and protect monarch habitats. This can be as simple as adding milkweed and nectar sources to an existing garden or maintaining natural habitats with milkweed. When planning your garden or restoration area, it is important to plant milkweed species that are native to your region of the country. Native plants typically require less maintenance and are more beneficial to local wildlife. Harvey County, Kansas is considered to be in the northeast eco region for milkweed. In this region, milkweed species that are preferred by monarchs and easy to establish are: common milkweed, swamp milkweed, butterfly milkweed, and poke milkweed. If started from seed indoors, allow 4-8 weeks growing time before transplanting outdoors. Seeds of most milkweed species need to be stratified before planting. This means that they need to be cold treated for 3-6 weeks before planting. Without stratification, the percentage of seeds that germinate is usually low. Stratification can be accomplished by placing seeds in moist paper towels (in a baggie or other container) and left in the refrigerator. No effort is too small. Your garden can be a few plants on a patio, or many plants across acres of land. Pictured here is a bright orange butterfly milkweed plant at Harvey County West Park, a tagged monarch with swamp milkweed at East Park, and a fifth instar monarch caterpillar eating a Common milkweed leaf at the Osage nature trails. 
For more information about monarch conservation and how to garden for monarchs, visit www.monarchwatch.org. 
Additional information about monarchs can be found at
 www.monarchjointventure.org. 
Join other citizen scientist to collect long-term data on larval monarch populations and milkweed habitat www.mlmp.org.Image attachmentImage attachment

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. Kids today are our future leaders, doctors, teachers, first responders and more. It is imperative that we keep children safe and that they have supportive, loving families to help them grow. Everyone can play a part in preventing and stopping child abuse, from reporting it, to recognizing signs of it, or simply just spreading awareness. Oftentimes, children need you to speak up and be their voice.

We're always here for you. Always. There are several organizations ready to help and support our children along with us, like CASA A Voice for Children, Inc., Heart to Heart Child Advocacy Center, Kansas Children's Service League and the Kansas Department for Children and Families. Please don't hesitate to use these resources.

The Kansas Protection Report Center can be reached at any time at 1-800-922-5330.
... See moreSee less

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. Kids today are our future leaders, doctors, teachers, first responders and more. It is imperative that we keep children safe and that they have supportive, loving families to help them grow. Everyone can play a part in preventing and stopping child abuse, from reporting it, to recognizing signs of it, or simply just spreading awareness. Oftentimes, children need you to speak up and be their voice.

Were always here for you. Always. There are several organizations ready to help and support our children along with us, like CASA A Voice for Children, Inc., Heart to Heart Child Advocacy Center, Kansas Childrens Service League and the Kansas Department for Children and Families. Please dont hesitate to use these resources.

The Kansas Protection Report Center can be reached at any time at 1-800-922-5330.

Comment on Facebook

Someone witness a man cursing his wife/ partner and 3 small children and screaming at them at a Walmart parking lot. The poor children looked so scared. Women please don't put up with that stuff! There is help out there for you and your children. I wonder what that man does behind closed doors!! 😪😪

How nice that the North Newton Child Abusers are out and able to celebrate 🎉

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County confirms first COVID-19 case

2020/03/27

The Harvey County Health Department announced its first presumptive-positive case...

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2020/03/20

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Frequently Asked Questions About Coronavirus (COVID-19)

2020/03/20

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County operation changes for COVID-19 prevention, online tools available

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Information on coronavirus (COVID-19)

2020/03/3

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Appraiser's Office mails annual valuation notices

2020/02/29

Valuation notices have been mailed from the Harvey County Appraiser's...

Census count begins again in 2020

2020/02/13

The 2020 census will soon be underway in Harvey County...

What we did in 2019

2020/01/2

Harvey County Administrator Anthony Swartzendruber presented a document filled with...

Airport to receive $7.2 million grant for taxiway

2019/11/27

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) – member of...

Welcome to Harvey County

Nearly 35,000 residents call Harvey County home. The county landscape pairs picturesque country living with vibrant downtown shopping centers. Harvey County serves the cities of Burrton, Halstead, Hesston, Newton, North Newton, Sedgwick, and Walton, as well as 15 townships.

Harvey County is home to a bustling airport and train service, innovative economic leaders, sprawling parks, and welcoming school districts. Food and entertainment opportunities abound, with even more amenities within a short driving distance to our friendly neighboring counties.

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